Pretty Tumblr Themes
Inspirations for the Originative Vagabond

*~Anything & everything from time and/or space that happens to catch my fancy~*





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To bid reviving virtue raise her head,
And far abroad her heav’nly influence shed;
The soul by bright examples to inspire,
And kindle in each breast celestial fire:
For injur’d innocence to waken fear;
For suff’ring virtue swell the gen’rous tear;
Vice to expose in each assum’d disguise,
And bid the mist to vanish from your eyes,
With keener passion, that you may detest
Her hellish form, howe’er like virtue drest:
The muse to cherish, genius to inspire,
Bid fancy stretch the wing, and wit take fire-
For these we come - oh! may your smiles attend
The pleasing task, and all our toils befrend,
- Away ye senseless, ye whom nought can move,
Vice to abhor, or virtue to approve;
Whose souls could ne’er enjoy the thought sublime,
Whose ears ne’er taste the muses’ flowing rhime.

But ye whose breasts the pow’rs of softness know,
Who long have learnt to feel another’s woe;
Nor blush to heave the sympathetic sigh,
Or drop the pious tear from pity’s eye;
Attend our work, and may you ever find
Something to please and to improve the mind:
That as each diff’rent flow’r that decks the field
Does to the bee mellifluous sweetness yield:
So may each scene some useful moral show;
From each performance sweet instruction flow.
Such is our aim - your kind assent we ask,
That once obtain’d, we glory in the task.

- Spoken by Mr. Lewis Hallam, at the opening of a Theatre at Philadelphia June 25, 1759





A good book, a cup of tea, & a feathery snow descending on the city scene

A good book, a cup of tea, & a feathery snow descending on the city scene




design-production:

everythingscenic:

Lord of the Flies. Jon Bausor.

ARE YOU F%&^ING KIDDING ME?!

THIS IS ABSOLUTELY INCREDIBLE

(via fuckyeahgreatplays)





It’s true! You’re not rescuing dogs by buying them from pet shops!





From the 1600s to today



My favorite song right now



I find all ten of these traits to absolutely true with myself and with many other creative types that I know.


reprogrammingmyself:

thepeoplesrecord:

"The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.
I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing. It was at this time I realized in our efforts to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity. We consciously elected to devalue human life both in Iraq and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.
In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror.
Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission.
Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracy—the Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyism, the Japanese-American internment camps—to name a few. I am confident that many of our actions since 9/11 will one day be viewed in a similar light.
As the late Howard Zinn once said, “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”
I understand that my actions violated the law, and I regret if my actions hurt anyone or harmed the United States. It was never my intention to hurt anyone. I only wanted to help people. When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love for my country and a sense of duty to others.
If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society. I will gladly pay that price if it means we could have country that is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal.”
- Statement by Pfc. B. Manning as read by David Coombs at a press conference after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

PARDON HIM!

reprogrammingmyself:

thepeoplesrecord:

"The decisions that I made in 2010 were made out of a concern for my country and the world that we live in. Since the tragic events of 9/11, our country has been at war. We’ve been at war with an enemy that chooses not to meet us on any traditional battlefield, and due to this fact we’ve had to alter our methods of combating the risks posed to us and our way of life.

I initially agreed with these methods and chose to volunteer to help defend my country. It was not until I was in Iraq and reading secret military reports on a daily basis that I started to question the morality of what we were doing. It was at this time I realized in our efforts to meet this risk posed to us by the enemy, we have forgotten our humanity. We consciously elected to devalue human life both in Iraq and Afghanistan. When we engaged those that we perceived were the enemy, we sometimes killed innocent civilians. Whenever we killed innocent civilians, instead of accepting responsibility for our conduct, we elected to hide behind the veil of national security and classified information in order to avoid any public accountability.

In our zeal to kill the enemy, we internally debated the definition of torture. We held individuals at Guantanamo for years without due process. We inexplicably turned a blind eye to torture and executions by the Iraqi government. And we stomached countless other acts in the name of our war on terror.

Patriotism is often the cry extolled when morally questionable acts are advocated by those in power. When these cries of patriotism drown our any logically based intentions [unclear], it is usually an American soldier that is ordered to carry out some ill-conceived mission.

Our nation has had similar dark moments for the virtues of democracy—the Trail of Tears, the Dred Scott decision, McCarthyism, the Japanese-American internment camps—to name a few. I am confident that many of our actions since 9/11 will one day be viewed in a similar light.

As the late Howard Zinn once said, “There is not a flag large enough to cover the shame of killing innocent people.”

I understand that my actions violated the law, and I regret if my actions hurt anyone or harmed the United States. It was never my intention to hurt anyone. I only wanted to help people. When I chose to disclose classified information, I did so out of a love for my country and a sense of duty to others.

If you deny my request for a pardon, I will serve my time knowing that sometimes you have to pay a heavy price to live in a free society. I will gladly pay that price if it means we could have country that is truly conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all women and men are created equal.”

- Statement by Pfc. B. Manning as read by David Coombs at a press conference after Manning was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

PARDON HIM!

(via theobjectprojectblog)